Posts Tagged ‘lawnmaster’

Prepare your lawn for fall this August

As summer winds down, I hear a lot of folks saying they always like to wait until September or October to begin lawn repairs. My response is, “Why wait until fall”? While fall is ideal for many lawn repairs after a hot, wet or dry summer, (seeding, topdressing, aeration, and over seeding), a wetter, cooler summer means you can get a jump start in August. These extra weeks gained by not waiting for fall means more growth and a better chance for new grass to survive the upcoming winter. I recommend August lawn work with several important objectives and facts in mind.

 

An established lawn looking great after topdressing and seeding.

An established lawn looking great after topdressing and seeding.

 

 

First, annual weeds, including crabgrass and other obnoxious plants, begin the slow process of dying, losing their iron clad grip on previously damaged or thin patches of turf. Crabgrass no longer germinates as it did in the spring or early summer; the threat of being overrun is subdued simply because of the time of year. This is a big reason to start lawn renovations in August versus later in the fall.
Unlike the past several summers, this summer has been wet and moist, making an ideal environment for August seeding. The soil is moist and warm, both critical factors for any kind of lawn renovation, from a small patch to a complete lawn installation. The extra weeks gained by August repairs can tip the scale for winter survival simply by allowing for more growth before the season winds down to a close in November. Seed needs warm soil and moisture to properly germinate and grow; we have both conditions as I write this blog post.
Is your lawn thin? Does it have weak areas? Don’t just throw down any seed. The most successful reseeding means core aeration, top-dressing with compost or loam over the bare areas, then seeding/over seeding with a blend of hybrid grasses best suited for your location. All grasses are not created equal for the same site or location. For more information on the importance of selecting the correct grass seed click here   http://www.mrgrassblog.net/2012/08/11/grass-seed-facts/
As fall approaches, build up your lawn’s energy reserves by adding high calcium lime, spraying compost tea, and adding vital nutrients with any high grade fertilizer that is low in phosphate and contains organic material (natural or organic). Once the new grass exceeds 3”, be sure to mow; mowing is more helpful then not mowing. And, while I always recommend mowing to a 3” height during the season, your last cut before winter should be the only short cut right around 1.5”. This will help prevent winter snow mold and discourage mice damage.
As you shop for back-to-school items, don’t forget your grassy friend outside called your lawn. Remember, fall is the best time of year for many aspects of lawn care and this year it looks as though we have gained August as well. Don’t wait, make your plan and take action today.

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Less clippings and mowing equates to a happy lawn owner

Everyone loves a lush green lawn, but hates frequent mowing and those huge piles of grass clippings.  Even though mulching is the proper long term way to mow a lawn, there are plenty of times when the pure volume of grass clippings calls for hauling them away, either by yourself or the landscaper.  The effort of disposing of grass clippings takes time and more importantly, money.  What about the crazy, fast growing grass in the spring?  Would you like more time between cuts?  I see lots of hands going up as you and others read this article this very moment.

Less grass clippings?
There are products that are specifically designed to address not only these concerns but offer even more benefits with such a seemingly mystical, wonderful treatment.  With your full attention, let’s explore exactly what I’m talking about as it relates to less grass clippings and less mowing.

The specific lawn treatment I reference can only be done when the turf is growing and in a healthy state, spring and fall to keep things simple; not the summer.  A single spray to an average lawn, consisting of the typical grasses found in NH and VT can reduce grass growth up to 50% for nearly 4 weeks; wow!  This spray causes the roots to grow, creating a more fibrous system while dramatically reducing top growth in the leaf blades.  The end result is more growth and roots in the soil, and less up top which dramatically reduces grass clippings.  Your lawn’s energy is now focused much like in the fall, creating lots of roots for winter and storing up energy.  The bonus of this process occurring in the spring means your grass is strengthened, like an athlete, for the stress of summer heat and drought.  Whether you enjoy your lawn for regular family gatherings, soccer practice, or special 4th of July barbeques; recovery will be faster and your grass will withstand the wear to a much higher degree then if not treated.

Lawn growing so fast
This could be the year you want a little break from the lawn chores and have us treat your lawn so you can do more playing and less mowing.  This product has been around for decades, used in the golf industry, greenhouses, and plant nurseries as a growth reduction hormone for plants.  As a certified, licensed company in NH and VT, you are assured Chippers will safely and professionally treat your lawn with this or any other of our lawn care treatments.  If you would like more information on this or any of our Essential Turf Care offerings, just click on this blog’s main page tab labeled “Lawn Care”, call, or email today.  We are very pleased to offer this new service in 2014 based on customer feedback and addressing what the public is looking for when it comes to offering only the best in professional lawn care in NH and VT.  Get ready for spring; it’s coming sooner than you think . . .

 
reduce grass clippings

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Compost tea: many benefits for your lawn this spring

Published by mrgrass on February 12th, 2014 - in Compost Tea

Maybe you are an avid lawn care consumer, sticking by tried and true products for years but are looking for that extra edge.  Perhaps your lawn has seen better days and experienced a recent insect infestation or has a chronic disease issue.  Would you like your lawn to green up faster in the spring?  Is your soil compacted or do you have bare spots?  While there is no miracle one size fits all cure to these ailments, they are all valid reasons to consider compost tea this year as a part of your normal lawn care program.  Like most lawn care consumers, you just don’t know what compost tea is and really have not given it much thought.  Maybe you thought compost tea was a new green age beverage to drink on a cold winter’s night?  After all, if your current lawn provider does not offer the service, how important could it be?  The simple answer, “Very”!

Compost Tea for lawns

So what is compost tea?  Compost tea in its simplest form is a liquid solution containing a variety of biological delights including but not limited to bacteria, fungi, protozoa, yeast, molasses, and water.  Most teas are alive and need to be applied soon once mixed so the benefit is obtained by getting the tea into the soil when the root system is most active.   Spring and fall are generally the best time periods to apply a compost tea although any time is better than none at all.  Spring applications have the ability to improve resistance to summer stress which is a valuable benefit to your lawn.

Here are the cold facts.  Conventional fertilizers are not particularly friendly to soil organisms which are part of any healthy ecosystem, your lawn included.  When used over decades, a salt imbalance can and usually does occur, reducing helpful soil organisms over time.  Without friendly organisms in your soil like earth worms, bacteria, fungi, and protozoa, the balance changes and this imbalance is generally bad for a lawn.  Healthy soil full of organisms support early spring greening, thatch reduction, air pockets for healthy roots, and degrade organic matter for themselves and your lawn’s use.  Air pockets mean healthy roots can grow longer when the soil is less compacted.  Air pockets mean water can be stored and drain better.  Bottom line, a healthy soil environment supports a more resilient lawn able to tolerate stress like drought, heat, and winter cold.  Spring compost tea in April and May fires up the soil and gets the lawn growing faster in cool climates; I’ve seen it work time and time again.

Compost tea helps stabilize your lawn’s soil, helping reduce disease issues when used as part of a well balanced lawn program or alone.  Compost tea is not just for those who appreciate organic products and the benefits; this product has a wide range of uses that spreads into ornamental trees, shrubs, and even flowers.  If your lawn is low in organic matter, a delightful way to add some over time is to use compost tea and recycle your own grass clippings when able to do so.

Compost tea improves soil health

Compost tea has a place in any lawn care program and should not be dismissed simply because of its unfamiliarity or because it is not offered by large national chains.  A healthy lawn and landscape can provide so much enjoyment during our short growing season here in New England; why not give your lawn what it needs to be the best and consider compost tea this year.  Compost tea is not a miracle product or elixir but it does make a great companion to any lawn or landscape.

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