Posts Tagged ‘lawn mowing’

Less clippings and mowing equates to a happy lawn owner

Everyone loves a lush green lawn, but hates frequent mowing and those huge piles of grass clippings.  Even though mulching is the proper long term way to mow a lawn, there are plenty of times when the pure volume of grass clippings calls for hauling them away, either by yourself or the landscaper.  The effort of disposing of grass clippings takes time and more importantly, money.  What about the crazy, fast growing grass in the spring?  Would you like more time between cuts?  I see lots of hands going up as you and others read this article this very moment.

Less grass clippings?
There are products that are specifically designed to address not only these concerns but offer even more benefits with such a seemingly mystical, wonderful treatment.  With your full attention, let’s explore exactly what I’m talking about as it relates to less grass clippings and less mowing.

The specific lawn treatment I reference can only be done when the turf is growing and in a healthy state, spring and fall to keep things simple; not the summer.  A single spray to an average lawn, consisting of the typical grasses found in NH and VT can reduce grass growth up to 50% for nearly 4 weeks; wow!  This spray causes the roots to grow, creating a more fibrous system while dramatically reducing top growth in the leaf blades.  The end result is more growth and roots in the soil, and less up top which dramatically reduces grass clippings.  Your lawn’s energy is now focused much like in the fall, creating lots of roots for winter and storing up energy.  The bonus of this process occurring in the spring means your grass is strengthened, like an athlete, for the stress of summer heat and drought.  Whether you enjoy your lawn for regular family gatherings, soccer practice, or special 4th of July barbeques; recovery will be faster and your grass will withstand the wear to a much higher degree then if not treated.

Lawn growing so fast
This could be the year you want a little break from the lawn chores and have us treat your lawn so you can do more playing and less mowing.  This product has been around for decades, used in the golf industry, greenhouses, and plant nurseries as a growth reduction hormone for plants.  As a certified, licensed company in NH and VT, you are assured Chippers will safely and professionally treat your lawn with this or any other of our lawn care treatments.  If you would like more information on this or any of our Essential Turf Care offerings, just click on this blog’s main page tab labeled “Lawn Care”, call, or email today.  We are very pleased to offer this new service in 2014 based on customer feedback and addressing what the public is looking for when it comes to offering only the best in professional lawn care in NH and VT.  Get ready for spring; it’s coming sooner than you think . . .

 
reduce grass clippings

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Don’t let matted leaves and early snow get you down

Clean up your yard before winter snow stays

Most folks got at least a few inches of snow this past weekend during a record setting October snow storm.  The impact on your lawn can be summed up in a few basic scenarios with the first involving moderate to substantial leaf litter on the ground now snow covered.  Left uncollected, these piles of leaves can be trouble for your lawn as colder weather approaches with snow that will not melt until spring.  As soon as you can remove leaf piles and other debris brought down by the heavy, wet snow you should plan on doing so to prevent smothering areas of your lawn.  The thicker the leaf pile, the better it will mulch your grass leaving dead spots and bare areas next year.

If you have your driveway plowed, now is a great time to put up stakes marking the edge of the lawn indicating the transition from gravel or pavement to grass.  Snow plow damage becomes visible in the spring time as snow recedes, exposing chunks of sod and grass tossed aside to dry out and die.  Without help, snow plow operators can have difficulty determining where your driveway ends and the lawn begins.  Such an error is commonplace during late night snow storms and can result in significant lawn damage.  Using posts, stakes, or sticks can provide a simple, yet effective signal and minimize or prevent the edge of your lawn from being “relocated”.

Even though it is now November, if you got caught with your lawn still needing another cut- say over 3” in height- don’t feel odd pulling out your mower for one last farewell mowing.  Many folks can remove leaves and mow simultaneously so this is a great opportunity to “get two birds with one stone” as the saying goes.  A clean, short cut in November is one way you can say “I love you” to your lawn before the onset of winter.

Many tree limbs were damaged by the weight of the snow with leaves still turning colors, many still green!  Be sure to have those branches cleanly pruned to help reduce future insect and disease damage.  Of course, remove as many downed branches on your lawn as possible, leaving the lawn surface as clean as possible before winter truly arrives.  Completing these basic housekeeping items can give your landscape the edge it might need to survive an unpredictable winter.

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July lawn tips, what to do when you take a vacation

A few easy steps can save your lawn during summer vacation

July is a month where your home lawn can be easily neglected due to many New Englanders seeking out the beach or mountain lakes on summer vacation.  There is a short checklist that can prevent some issues and provide peace of mind while you are away enjoying those early morning beach walks.

Before you depart, make sure your lawn is cut the day before you leave if possible.  If you have a mowing service, the task of mowing is not really an issue.  If you mow yourself, a cut the day before will normally give you a solid 7 to 10 day time frame in which to return without the lawn having grown too long.  In fact, during a hot July period, it is better to go 2 weeks without mowing if the air temperature is in the 80’s and rainfall is absent.  If you return and your grass is really tall, such as over 6”, removal of your clippings is recommended or be sure to rake up the rows of cut grass.

Have your lawn inspected for insect activity; left unchecked, under ideal weather conditions you can lose a lawn in days without curative action.  I have seen a number of lawns with sod webworm damage with the characteristic tan moth taking flight as you walk near.  These small patches are fist size in nature and can coalesce into larger stripes or patches if not treated during the summer months.

Although this season has been on the humid and warm side, promoting diseases over insect activity, a professional lawn evaluation is worth the peace of mind.  If your lawn has confirmed disease issues, it may well be worth a fungicide application to “clean things up” during the July/August period where serious injury can occur.  Summer diseases can easily appear to be drought or insect activity.  Hot weather and warm nights can bring on blotches and spots in mere hours without you realizing the culprit.  You may awake and look out the kitchen window only to ask “Those patches were not there yesterday, were they?”  Thatchy lawns are particularly prone to summer patch diseases, manifesting as scars and pits when placed under stress.

Irrigation or lawn watering is helpful during dry periods but is not necessary during a standard summer vacation.  If you have a sprinkler system or a friend to water, be sure to water in the am or day versus late afternoon, thus minimizing disease issues.  As always, infrequent deep watering is preferred over frequent light watering to promote deeper root systems and minimize disease.  A 1hr watering every other day is generally preferred over a daily 15 minute watering.  Don’t let your lawn stop you from enjoying a great July summer vacation.

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