Posts Tagged ‘concord lawn care’

5 Things Your Lawn Wants to tell You

1. Location

As the winter begins and your lawn is covered by ice or snow, there are some secrets your lawn may be hiding. For starters, and this may seem simple, your lawn’s location has a huge bearing on what you should be thinking about before spring arrives. For instance, that encroaching tree line has slowly but surely thinned out the edges of your lawn over the past 5 or 10 years. Your once proud carpet of green has become a band of dirt and moss due to the shade and overgrown limbs hovering above the now missing grass.

2. Grass seed

The second lawn secret reveals that all lawn grasses are not created equal and do have limitations in response to drought, heavy use, and shade. Yes, many turf types can tolerate less than desirable growing conditions, but left alone, thinning and ultimately bare ground will result. Much like a receding hair line, the question is not if, but when the grass thins out enough to get your attention. Don’t think throwing lime down or some patch seed mix will suffice, oh no, this situation beckons professional help. Only an intervention to change the site and current grass types will truly resolve and reverse turf loss.

3. Mowing height

Although the 70’s have come and gone, many lawns are treated and cut at less than optimum intervals and height. The third lawn secret beckons a weekly cut to a handsome and proper 3” most times of the year, not a foot every month. If your lawn could speak, a basic request would be for a regular mowing and a realistic cutting height; not a shaggy carpet reminiscent of the 70’s where bell bottoms earned their following. On the other hand, a short military type cut can brown a lawn out for the summer causing irreversible damage. The harm done to your lawn by improper mowing cannot be underestimated.

4. Healthy soil

A fourth and valuable fact relates to soil health and the ability of your turf to not just exist – but to thrive. Healthy soil, full of organic matter, bacteria, fungi, and worms support not only a vibrant root system but a lawn that can withstand pests and environmental stress. Chronic and heavy use of salty fertilizers and other products over time can reduce soil health and thereby predispose your grass to a host of health issues. If your lawn could talk, it would ask for more positive reinforcements in the form of compost tea, organic materials, lime, and other soil enhancing actions.

5. Timing

Timing does matter. Our fifth lawn tip is timing as it relates to pest control, soil enhancements, seeding, aeration, and other helpful activities. Most pests, including weeds and insects are best controlled at very specific times of the year. For example, ticks are best controlled in the spring and late fall – the same time as most broadleaf weeds. Crabgrass is best controlled in the early spring while lawns installations, overseeding, and aeration are best done in the fall. Soil enhancements are best applied in the spring and fall when accompanied by seeding. Your lawn would tell you timing is everything!

 

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Looking Ahead to the 2015 Lawn Care Season

2014 Was a Good Year
It sure feels good to be able to say that 2014 was a good year for grass, at least in the Northeast. This can mostly be attributed to adequate moisture and no substantial heat waves. Cooler temperatures in general meant lawns did not go into heavy dormancy and therefore did better on the whole compared to the recent past. While spotty insect activity was typical, as was disease issues which had a better chance to flourish in the moist or humid conditions, taken on the whole, 2014 was a darn good grass season.

 

Don't wait until the spring to make your lawn plans

Don’t wait until the spring to make your lawn plans

 

Good Start to 2015
Unless your lawn underwent a tragic event, most folks are poised to start the 2015 lawn season in better than average shape. Great fall weather, with a touch of drought meant most lawns could prepare for the winter, especially if given some extra love. A cautionary note – a winter of ice and prolonged snow can still lead to winter kill, ice damage, and snow mold as March yields to warmer weather.

Review Your Lawn Program
As a home or business owner overseeing a maintained lawn or landscape, you should keep a few things in mind during the winter months before the daffodils pop. Review your 2014 services and be sure to give extra attention to your new 2015 program, most of which are mailed or e-mailed during the winter for acceptance. Are the current treatments sufficient? Are the products employed the right choice for the job based on your location or proximity to water for instance? Perhaps there are services which could be added or even dropped based on your budget or goals for 2015.

In any of these cases, knowing what your program was and will be is critical in stacking the cards in your favor for success in 2015. Once spring arrives, time passes quickly and often folks are busy with other activities, sometimes missing an important calendar window such as spring crabgrass or tick suppression in May. Reviewing and approving your landscape program over the winter removes this obstacle and ensures a more streamline flow come spring, eliminating the chance of starting off on the wrong foot so to speak.

Benefits of Early Approval of Lawn Program
As a provider of these types of services, Chippers can speak first hand as to how vital knowing the “who, what, and where” of our clients by the time taxes are due. The reason is simple; it ensures the proper timing and scheduling of important applications, particularly in the busy months of spring. The “what” helps us procure the precise materials demanded to do the job based on the program selection. Once the snow does go, the “who” ensures a timely application for superior results. The “where” helps us with efficient and effective scheduling.

In addition, there are often financial incentives for you for signing up early. Many companies provide early sign-up or even prepay discounts as a direct reflection of the importance of preseason approval.
No matter whom you employ to care for your lawn or landscape, be sure to ask questions if unsure about a given treatment, its need, or the products used. No matter what you may have heard or believe, there are numerous alternatives to accomplish the same result with organic or natural products.
A little effort now can put you in control of your landscape budget and yield big results come spring. Your lawn care or tree/shrub program should be in the same category as planning you garden with all those colorful seed catalogs with the promise of delicious fruits, vegetables, and flowers. Plan now for great results in 2015.

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Late fall lawn tips: raking and mowing

You know the lawns, the ones that stay buried in leaves from October until Memorial Day or the perfectly clean ones where not a single leaf can be found by Thanksgiving. Although these two kinds of lawns are at opposite ends of the autumn-leaf-removal spectrum, the point is made; you should do something about those leaves before the snow flies.

 

 

A clean, healthy green lawn will better handle winter issues.

A clean, healthy green lawn will better handle winter issues.

Heavy leaf cover acts like mulch and remember, we mulch to keep weeds and seeds from germinating in our landscape. The deeper the leaf cover and the larger the piles, the more likely this lawn will thin out or end up as bare ground come late spring. The best solution to lots of leaves is a late season cleanup in November, well after foliage season has passed.

 
While obtaining a perfectly clean lawn is not necessary, a good raking or professional cleanup will go a long way toward protecting your lawn come winter. This way, next spring when things starting growing, your lawn can join the green-up and not be inhibited or damaged from heavy leaf cover left over from the prior year.

 
Another important item on the fall checklist is the final mowing. I get these questions a lot, “How short do I mow my lawn and when should the final cut be?” Generally, in northern New England, the final cut should be in November. The final mowing height should range right around 1.5”, depending upon grade, because an uneven lawn may be severely scalped if cut this low.

 

 

 

A healthy fall lawn

 

A short cut can help minimize snow mold, winter kill, ice damage, and even vole damage as outlined in my earlier post http://www.mrgrassblog.net/2014/10/20/mole-voles-landscape/. This is the only time of year I recommend a very short cut! A lawn that is left long (over 3”) is in jeopardy and greater peril for damage from the aforementioned issues. Add to that excessive leaf cover and your lawn can soon turn into a parking area versus a green space to enjoy.

 

The moral of today’s blog post is to cut your lawn short in November and keep it relatively leaf free before the snow flies for a happier and greener lawn next spring!

 

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