Archive for the ‘Seeding & Overseeding’ Category

Lawn renovation from start to finish

A recent lawn evaluation in Vermont actually became a lawn renovation.  The lawn had not been cared for in some time and was overgrown with various weeds.  The client wanted to reclaim the lawn and improve the view off the end of the lawn by removing some low growing brush and saplings.  The first order of business was to start with a clean slate by spraying the existing lawn area to destroy the vegetation.  We then had the soil tilled to provide a seed bed after determining the consistency was appropriate.  In fact, we did not have to add any additional loam after tilling but simply raked out and removed the dead vegetation prior to seeding.  The attached pictures in this blog post start with the sprayed vegetation, followed by the removed brush and the completely tilled and seeded lawn.  The final picture shows the established lawn about seven weeks later. Quite a transformation and the client was thrilled.

We sprayed the existing lawn which consisted of weeds and assorted plants.

We sprayed the existing lawn which consisted of weeds and assorted plants.

Lawn is now tilled and seeded.

Lawn is now tilled and seeded plus the view has been enhanced by removal of brush at the bank level.

The final product, enjoy.

The final product

Although most lawns can be improved “as is” without this kind of renovation technique, Chippers has the ability to diagnose and renovate lawns from small to large.  Due to widespread insect, weather (hurricane Irene), and disease damage over the past few years, we have been involved in many more lawn restoration projects than in the past.  If you think your lawn is in need of assistance, have us take a look and we can determine if your lawn needs a complete face lift or simply a little love in the form of lawn treatments.  Fall and spring are ideal times for these projects. If you don’t have the time this fall plan ahead and get your lawn projects lined up for next spring.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+PinterestShare

A brief commentary on spring lawn seeding

 

Spring lawn seeding can be done in a single spot or an area providing a quick way to repair plow damage and dead spots from the winter, or damage incurred in the drought of 2012.  If done correctly, spring seeding can help restore otherwise lost grass area adding to summer enjoyment.

Spring lawn seeding can help repair plow damage

Spring seeding can normally be done once the ground warms until early-to-mid June if properly done and with appropriate weed suppression.  Spring seeding takes a second seat to fall seeding due to reduced crabgrass and weed pressure in the fall.  Fall seeding affords warm soils and fast germination without crabgrass or annual weed choking out new growth.  However, with special treatments, spring seeding can be successful if done carefully and with the proper grass blends.

Regardless of how you fix your lawn, the grass types installed are critical toward long term success.  All grass blends are not created equal and you get what you pay for in terms of age, weed content, and site specific blends, be it drought-shade, sun, play or other locations.  Cheap grass seed and a lack of foresight is a common error in repairing or installing a lawn.  What appeared to be success can quickly turns to brown grass and defeat.

Full lawn installations are best saved for early spring or late summer into fall due to generally favorable weather.  Small repairs can be done anytime during the year but keep in mind, you will have weeds and crabgrass of varying population levels.  These weeds can be treated with a variety of specialty sprays but these are not inexpensive and must be done properly with qualified, licensed turf companies like Chippers.

Watering is the second most important factor in achieving good germination and helping establish a new lawn.  Without water, your seed will stay dormant and cannot germinate.  If you water in the beginning and then stop, the shallow rooted seedlings may perish within days without an adequate supply from rain or irrigation.  Try and water in the morning and late afternoon in the absence of rainfall to keep the seed alive and improve both germination and growth performance.

The overall success of your seeding can be summed up by two main factors; watering and seed type/quality.         

 

 

FacebookTwitterGoogle+PinterestShare

Spring lawn checklist for 2013

  • Your spring lawn checklist should include a review of your 2013 turf contract this winter or spring to take advantage of any preseason savings and to insure the work will be scheduled on a timely basis.  Lawn care companies are expecting an unprecedented high volume of work due to the heat, drought, and insect damage of 2012.

2013 spring lawn checklist, review it closely.

 

  • Check for grubs or other past insect damage (treat accordingly).
  • Schedule any renovation work early, as the demand will quickly find quality companies becoming booked with spring work, leaving you with limited choices or having to wait until fall.
  • Schedule your spring core aeration if you skipped it in 2012.
  • Schedule your spring lime and crabgrass inhibitor to get your lawn off to a good start.
  • Watch for ticks in April and May as the adults emerge looking for a meal!
  • Wait until the ground warms sufficiently before attempting any seeding.  April seeding generally does not perform well due to cold soil temperatures, even in southern NH.
  • Remove any debris which may have covered your lawn and cause harm such as branches, piles of leaves, plowed up sod, or gravel along the driveway.
  • Mow your lawn to 1.5 to 2” to help speed up soil warming in the spring. .  If the cut is good, just give your lawn a good raking an early spring weekend.
  • Do not dethatch or “power rake” your lawn unless it has a severe thatch issue.  This process causes more issues than it solves by tearing up healthy plants, dormant leaves and discourages a healthy recovery after winter.  Snow mold or winter damage will be magnified with power dethatching.  Save this process for the fall if you really need to see that huge pile of dethatched grass.
FacebookTwitterGoogle+PinterestShare
© Copyright 2009-2014 Chippers, Inc. All Rights Reserved.